August 16th, 2016

“#iwillmedievalfutureyou4” at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

"#iwillmedievalfutureyou4" at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

Artists: Grégoire Chamayou, Cécile B. Evans, Nadya Grishina, Abu Bakarr Mansaray, Nathaniel Mellors, Agnieszka Polska, Mika Rottenberg, Mark von Schlegel, Synd og Skam, Peter Wächtler

Venue: Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

Exhibition Title: #iwillmedievalfutureyou4

Curated by: Jacob Fabricius

Date: May 20 – August 14, 2016

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"#iwillmedievalfutureyou4" at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

"#iwillmedievalfutureyou4" at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

"#iwillmedievalfutureyou4" at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde. Photos by Frida Gregersen.

Press Release:

The cryptic English title # I will medieval future you 4 draws both backwards and forwards at the same time; ‘I will’ is an act that points forward, indicating or predicting something that’s going to happen; ‘Medieval’ points back; and ‘future’ points towards an undefined future. The sentence #iwillmedievalfutureyou4 can be read as a kind of vendetta, revenge or love letter (depending on how you look at the medieval times and / or future) against a person, place, community or global condition.

The participating artists for the exhibition are Grégoire Chamayou (France), Cécile B. Evans (Belgium/US), Nadya Grishina (Russia), Abu Bakarr Mansaray (Sierra Leone), Nathaniel Mellors (United Kingdom), Agnieszka Polska (Poland), Mika Rottenberg (Argentina/US), Mark von Schlegel (US), Synd og Skam (Denmark) og Peter Wächtler (Germany).

The artists’ show absurd and dystopian representations of the time we are living in. And in and through the works the exhibition will attempt to mirror the primitive in our present and possible future. The works depict travelling through time and space, both backward and forward. As such the exhibition can be seen as an epic tale of the future showing the dreams, fantasies and meltdown of these.

Bishop and writer Jan Lindhardt’s book Toward the Middle Ages is a cultural representation of how television, internet, mobile phones and other electronic media have, in certain ways, recreated the common room of the middle ages where no one can hide, as opposed to the time of the written culture that delivered us the private room. Technologies enable complex and temporal conditions; presents are shared, geographically and physically detached on several levels. The futurist Alvin Toffler, who wrote the classic book Future Shock and The Third Wave describes the future as follows: “The future always comes too fast and in the wrong order.”

The exhibition is serial and will, over the next 100 years, be presented in 10 different ways within different frames. The exhibition is curated by Jacob Fabricius, Artistic Director, Kunsthal Aarhus.

Link: “#iwillmedievalfutureyou4” at Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde

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